Workplace safety management includes planning for resources and all the activities that go along with maintaining a management program. All human resources have a key role to play regarding workplace safety and management. Workplace safety management requires program planning, resource availability, and active leadership to assure consistent deployment.

Workplace safety management includes planning for resources and all the activities that go along with maintaining a management program. All human resources have a key role to play regarding workplace safety and management. Workplace safety management requires program planning, resource availability, and active leadership to assure consistent deployment.

Hazard Identification

The need to identify and evaluate a work environment for existing hazards and conditions that are subject to change is significant in safety management. For most work sites, hazard identification involves conducting hazard inspections and reviewing related literature, such as material safety and hazard information provided in the organization. A checklist is an important tool to a successful workplace safety program, although identification is not limited to inspecting only the checklist. Both general and specific checklists need to be constructed for certain operations. For instance, a use of a variety of metalworking equipments or certain chemicals would certainly require specific checklists. An effective safety management program with employee participation, while anticipating and developing programs to help prevent harmful occurrences will aid in the identification of hazards. The evaluation will entail conducting comprehensive baseline workplace assessments, updating the assessments periodically, and allowing employees to participate in the evaluations. Conducting incident investigations demonstrates meaningful management commitment toward employee safety and health. To be in compliance with regulations, incident investigations must be conducted in timely fashion and in writing, while the unsafe acts that are discovered must be corrected.

Leadership Involvement

An effective safety culture in the workplace rests on the shoulders of the management team of an organization regardless of the structure. The management team, generally a smaller subset of the organization and higher still on the hierarchical structure, has the responsibility of confirming that hazard mitigation activities have taken place and that supervisors are meeting their responsibilities. If management demonstrates commitment and provides the motivating force and the needed resources to manage safety, an effective system can be developed and will be sustained. A good management system fosters a culture of safety awareness and motivation at all levels of the organization capitalizing on the impact of positive group dynamics as a way of shaping individual attitudes and behaviors. The safety situations encompass both exposures to physical hazards and work practices that put the employee at a greater risk of an injury. The management system should be evaluated to ensure that it is effective and appropriate to specific workplace conditions. Nonetheless, the system should be revised in a timely manner to correct any deficiencies as identified by any program evaluation.