Traditional salary schedules versus diversified salary schedules

Traditional salary schedules versus diversified salary schedules

Order Description

You can choose to carry out an interview-based, small-scale research project on the same topic of “Traditional salary schedules versus diversified salary schedules.” In such as case, you will read about the pros and cons of each type of salary schedules, prepare interview questions, and get the perceptions of one or two teachers on these two types. Analyze and discuss the findings and provide some recommendations.

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CHAPTER
11
If you like to argue, you will enjoy writing position papers and argument essays. The
purpose of a position paper or argument essay is to explain both sides of a controversy
and then argue for one side over the other. This two-sided approach is what
makes position papers and argument essays different from commentaries (Chapter 10).
A commentary usually only expresses the author’s personal opinion about a current
issue or event. A position paper or argument essay explains both sides and discusses
why one is stronger or better than the other.
Your goal is to fairly explain your side and your opponents’ side of the issue, while
highlighting the differences between these opposing views. You need to use solid reasoning
and factual evidence to persuade your readers that your view is more valid or
advantageous than your opponents’ view.
In college, your professors will ask you to write position papers and argument
essays to show that you understand both sides of an issue and can support one side or
the other. In the workplace, corporate position papers are used to argue for or against
business strategies or alternatives. The ability to argue effectively is a useful skill that
will help you throughout your life.
Position Papers
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Summary of
opponents’ position
Limitations of
opponents’ position
Your understanding
of the issue
Reasons why your
understanding is better
than your opponents’
understanding
Introduction
Conclusion
Major point of difference
Opponents’ position
Your position
Major point of difference
Opponents’ position
Your position
Reasons why your
understanding is better
than your opponents’
understanding
Introduction
Conclusion
•••
Position Papers
This diagram shows two basic organizations for a position paper, but other
arrangements of these sections will work too. In the pattern on the left, the opponents’
position is described up front with its limitations; then your own position is explained
with its strengths. In the pattern on the right, you make a point-by-point comparison,
explaining why your position is better than your opponents’. You should alter this
organization to fit your topic, angle, purpose, readers, and context.
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AT–A–GLANCE
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Overview 223
Overview
Arguing is fun, but you need to argue fairly and reasonably if you want to win over
your readers. The strongest position papers and argument essays present both sides
of an issue as objectively as possible and then persuade readers that one side is superior
to the other. They tend to have the following features:
• An introduction that states the issue being debated, identifies the issue’s two or
more sides, and usually makes an explicit claim (thesis) that the position paper
or argument essay will support.
• An objective summary of your opponents’ understanding of the issue.
• A point-by-point discussion of the limitations of your opponents’ understanding.
• A summary of your side’s understanding of the issue.
• A point-by-point discussion of why your side’s understanding is superior to your
opponents’ understanding.
• A conclusion that drives home your main point and looks to the future.
This genre tends to be organized two ways, as shown on page 222. With some
topics, you may need to show that there are more than two sides to the argument. In
these cases, the pattern on the left can be expanded to include summaries and limitations
of these other positions. It is best, though, to try to boil the issue down to two
major sides. Otherwise, your readers will find it difficult to keep the sides of the argument
straight.