Theory, Methodology, and Cultural Norms

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Euripides. Among the tragedies in our reader, four, Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus, and Bacchants, have received concentrated attention in class. (1) Drawing upon at least three of these four (plus any of the others in the reader you may wish to add), compare and contrast the representations of males and females. (2) To what extent are any of the tragedies primarily (or at least significantly) concerned with differences of gender? (3) To what extent, and in what ways, is gender a factor in the plot? (4) Plot aside, what messages about gender does Euripides put in the mouths of his characters? And are these messages merely elements of the dramatic situation, or do they represent Euripides’ own convictions? (5) And how do you think the audience might have reacted (given you study of the “real” world of classical Athens earlier in the course)?Euripides. Among the tragedies in our reader, four, Alcestis, Medea, Hippolytus, and Bacchants, have received concentrated attention in class. (1) Drawing upon at least three of these four (plus any of the others in the reader you may wish to add), compare and contrast the representations of males and females. (2) To what extent are any of the tragedies primarily (or at least significantly) concerned with differences of gender? (3) To what extent, and in what ways, is gender a factor in the plot? (4) Plot aside, what messages about gender does Euripides put in the mouths of his characters? And are these messages merely elements of the dramatic situation, or do they represent Euripides’ own convictions? (5) And how do you think the audience might have reacted (given you study of the “real” world of classical Athens earlier in the course)?
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