The Rise of China: A Potential Concern to the world order?

The ascendancy of China economically, militarily and increasingly politically has become a source of concern for the international community, and in particular, the United States of America. Some observers have particularly singled out frictional nature of power transitions at an international level (Ikenberry, 2008). China’s ascendancy is of interest given its origins and facilitations. This is because while it is gaining clout internationally, China’s economic prosperity is inextricably linked to that of rest of the world (Carr, 2010). Economic gains are normally viewed with favor provided these do not mean a disruption of the international status quo. This is an exception for China in the modern setting, as subsequent paragraphs demonstrate.

Political analysts worry that China growth portends a major reorientation of the international system vis-à-vis challenging the extant international relations status quo (Legro, 2007). They attribute their concerns to the historical and socio-cultural mindset of the Chinese. For instance, the socio-political backdrop against which China forged its present achievements was turbulent; various wars, a chaotic domestic market and weak, non-existent or disastrous central-government regulatory frameworks characterized that early period (Rawski, 2011). Nonetheless, gradual reforms, notably the shift from government controlled enterprises to private ownership of enterprises, increased returns on investments and introduced a semblance of order in the domestic Chinese market. Overtime, this has resulted in substantial economic gains with international implications.