The efficiency of the Judiciary with regard to the legal maxim: "Justice delayed is justice denied “ Court Backlog and Delays in Kosovo.

In accordance with Article 19 of the statute of the European Faculty of Law in Nova Gorica (clean copy of 21 December 2011), the Management Board of the European Faculty of Law in Nova Gorica adopted on 30 September 2014 the following

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF THESES


1 FORMATTING RULES

Paper size standard: A4.

 

Page orientation: portrait.

 

Margins: 3 cm (top, left and right) and 2.5 cm (bottom).

 

Text formatting:

  • Font: Arial is recommended.
  • Body text font size: 12 points, regular.
  • Spacing: 1.2 lines.
  • Alignment: justified.
  • Optional use of soft hyphens.

 

Printing

Double-sided printing for soft-cover copies and single-sided for hard-cover copies from the table of contents onwards (including the table of contents).

 

Binding

  1. Diploma theses

Diploma theses should be bound in dark-blue cloth or a similar material (hard cover). The lettering on the cover should be embossed in silver.

Page numbering

The pages should be numbered consecutively from the first to the last page (bottom center).

  • The page number should not be printed on the (inside) title page.
  • The Slovenian abstract should be numbered with a lowercase Roman numeral ii, the foreign-language abstract with a lowercase Roman numeral iii and the table of contents with lowercase numerals iv, v, etc.
  • The remainder of the thesis (from the introduction to the conclusion) should be numbered with Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc., the first page of the introduction being numbered with 1).

 

Length

  1. Diploma theses

The usual length of a diploma thesis is 90,000 to 150,000 characters without spaces (i.e. 45 to 60 pages of text). Any appendices do not count towards the length of the diploma thesis. Regardless of the number of characters, diploma theses must be at least 45 pages long.

 

2 THESIS STRUCTURE

 

Theses must be structured as described below Structure refers to the composition, layout and integration of all the sections of a thesis. The structure of a thesis must include the following elements:

 

2.1. Abstract

 

The abstract provides a clear overview of the full contents of the thesis. Its purpose is to provide the reader with basic information about the thesis. The abstract must be written in Slovenian and one of the world languages. The keywords are listed at the bottom of the Slovenian and foreign-language abstracts. The abstract is usually 15 to 20 lines long including the keywords.

 

2.2 Table of contents

 

The table of contents presents the basic layout of the thesis and helps the reader find the required information in the thesis. The table of contents essentially provides a numerical and textual list of the sections and subsections contained in the thesis, allowing the reader to quickly find the page on which a given section or subsection is located.

 

2.3 Introduction

 

The introduction is a mandatory part of every thesis. It constitutes the opening section of the thesis and serves to present the thesis and its author to the reader. In the introduction, the author introduces the reader to the topic discussed in the thesis, familiarises them with the research question and subject matter, the hypothesis and the aims and objectives of their research, reviews the previous research and presents the scientific methodology used and the structure of the thesis. The introduction must concretise the statements made by the student in the explanations and working hypotheses given in their application. However, as opposed to the application, where the future tense was used, the introduction should be written in the past tense. An introduction should generally contain the following elements:

 

  1. Diploma thesis introduction
  • A definition of the subject of the thesis.
  • The aims and objectives of the thesis.
  • The research question and/or hypothesis(es).
  • A review of previous research.
  • The work methodology.
  • A brief summary of each section.

The introduction should generally constitute 5% of the total length of the thesis.

 

2.4 Main body

 

2.4.1 Diploma thesis body

 

The body of a diploma thesis generally encompasses a historical and theoretical part, an analytical and experimental part and a conclusion and future work part.

 

These parts of the body of the diploma thesis constitute content sections that can be further divided into multiple sections and subsections, each having a heading of its own. It is advisable for the topic of the diploma thesis to be covered in a total of up to five interconnected parts (sections), each of which can be further divided into up to three subsections. The sections and subsections of the diploma thesis should be numbered using the decimal (classification) system with up to four decimal units. Each decimal unit and its corresponding heading must be included in the table of contents of the diploma thesis (the decimal system is 1, 10, 100, etc.; the decimal classification system is 1, 1.1, 1.1.1, 2., 2.1, 2.1.1, etc.).

 

The purpose of the historical and theoretical part is to present the development of the topic discussed in the thesis and the current theoretical knowledge about it.

 

The analytical and experimental part is the most important part of a diploma thesis. In it, the student demonstrates their knowledge, experience, creativity and capacity for critical thinking. The student must be able to logically connect the relevant findings, facts, evidence and ideas in the definition of the topic of their diploma thesis and draw the appropriate conclusions. They must do so independently, always remaining objective in their assessments, evaluations and suggestions and demonstrating their independence and responsibility by providing adequate arguments and substantiated evidence. In this part, the student incorporates the views, findings and formulations of others, making certain to properly cite the sources used.

 

The conclusion and future work part of the diploma thesis must clearly, systematically and concisely present the relevant findings, information, observations and established facts discussed and explained in detail in the analytical and experimental part of the diploma thesis. This part should not contain any quotations or footnotes. This part should also not be subdivided and numbered using the decimal system but should be structured in paragraphs ordered chronologically according to the structure of the diploma thesis.

 

Reference list

All the literature and sources used should be listed at the end of the diploma thesis. The references should be ordered alphabetically by the surname of the author and numbered consecutively. Sources should be divided into separate groups. The list should contain a minimum of 10 units.

 

List of tables and figures (below the table of contents if required)

The tables, charts, drawings, diagrams, charts, maps and other figures included in the diploma thesis should be listed chronologically, divided into separate groups according to the type of figure.

 

List of acronyms and abbreviations (if required) Acronyms and their meanings should be listed separately.

 

List of Slovenian translations of foreign terms (below the table of contents if required)

 

List of appendices (if required)

Questionnaires, analytical tables and other materials should be listed chronologically in a list of appendices at the end of the diploma thesis.

 

Declaration of authorship and indication of the proofreader (before the abstracts)

The declaration should contain the following statement:

 

I hereby confirm that:

  • this thesis is solely the result of my own research;
  • this thesis has been revised as requested by my mentor and the thesis committee;
  • I have made certain that the works and views of other authors that I have used in this thesis have been referenced in accordance with the instructions of the faculty;
  • I am aware that plagiarism – presenting the original work or idea of another, whether in the form of a quotation, paraphrase or graphical representation, as my own work or idea – is punishable by law (Copyright and Related Rights Act (ZASP) – Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia Nos. 21/1995, 9/2001, 30/2001 – ZCUKPIL, 43/2004, 17/2006, 114/2006 – ZUE, 139/2006 and 68/2008);
  • the electronic version of this thesis is identical to the printed version and that I give my consent to the publication of the thesis on the faculty’s website;

this thesis has been proofread by _____________________________.

 

On the left side below the declaration, the student should indicate the place and date. On the right side, the student should write out their name and surname and make a vertical line, on which they should sign their name by hand.

 

3 DOCUMENTATIONAL BASIS OF THE THESIS MANUSCRIPT

 

The documentational basis of the thesis manuscript refers to the citation and referencing of literature and figures, and footnotes.

Glossary according to the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus:

  • quotation: a phrase or short piece of writing taken from a longer work of literature, poetry, etc. or what someone else has said;
  • reference: a writer or a book, article, etc. that is mentioned in a piece of writing, showing you where the person writing found their information;
  • footnote: a note printed at the bottom of a page that gives extra information about something that has been written on that page.

 

3.1 Citation

 

When writing a thesis, it is important to strictly separate one’s own text from the text, findings, thoughts, ideas, data, illustrations, etc., of others. The author of the thesis may use other authors’ definitions of concepts, scientific facts, ideas, data, information, illustrations, etc., but they must always clearly indicate the source and the author in the prescribed manner. This is done using properly cited quotations. Quotation is understood as the verbal or written repetition of the parts of a text or the words of another word for word in a manner allowing the quotation to be checked.

Quotation has multiple purposes. The student uses quotations to illustrate a certain notion that serves to support their own idea by referring to a certain authority.

Students also often use quotations to support their own counter-arguments against the ideas of another author.

If certain words or parts of a quotation are omitted, they should be replaced by an ellipsis. Care must be taken to ensure that the original author’s ideas are not changed in such elliptical quotations.

If the text is printed in italics or boldface, the student must preserve the formatting in their quotation. If the student wishes to highlight a quotation with italics or boldface, they must indicate this in a footnote (e.g. ‘underscored by the author of the thesis’).

Essential quotations and quotations in professional works that are primarily intended for foreign readers may be left in their original language. In this case, the foreign-language quotation must be translated and the translation must be included in a footnote. When quoting text, the student must take ensure that the volume of text from external sources is appropriate in consideration of the results of their own research and findings. Quotations must be properly incorporated into the text and must relate to the topic of the thesis.

Quotations of the words of other authors must be enclosed in quotation marks and the source must be properly cited after the quoted text. When the student interprets a longer passage of text in their own words and style (paraphrasing), they must indicate the source from which the paraphrased text was taken. Failure to cite other authors and their works is considered plagiarism (intellectual theft).

 

There are a number of citation styles or systems. Two main citation styles or systems are used:

  • the European system (using footnotes),
  • the American or Harvard system (in-text citation in parentheses at the end of the quoted text).

 

Students should use the European citation system or the system recommended by their mentor.

 

 

3.2 REFERENCES AND NOTES

 

References and notes should be given in footnotes in regular 10-point font. The footnote and the location in the text to which the footnote refers should be designated with a unique number. Footnotes should be numbered consecutively from the beginning to the end of the text.

 

Two types of footnotes are generally used, namely:

  • Explanatory notes. These notes serve as an additional explanation of certain parts of explanations, data, information, observations, facts or findings within the text.
  • Comparative notes. These notes serve to reference other parts of the same source or other bibliographic units that deal with identical or similar issues.

 

Footnotes should be included at the bottom of the page, separated from the main text with a vertical line (the length of the separator line is up to 1/5 of the length of the width of the text) and numbered with Arabic numerals. Footnotes should always be on the same page and numbered with the same number as the corresponding reference numbers in the text. Footnotes should generally be numbered consecutively in chronological order from the beginning to the end of the thesis, without parentheses.

 

RULES FOR WRITING CITATIONS, REFERENCES AND NOTES:

  • The name of the author is given first, followed by the year of publication of the work

and the page from which the quotation is taken: ‘T. Jerovšek, 2006, p. 37’.

  • If there are two authors, both of their names are given: ‘T. Jerovšek and J. Čebulj, 1995, p. 125’. If there are three authors, all of their names are given: ‘T. Jerovšek, J. Čebulj and P. Jambrek, 1995, p. 125’.
  • If there are more than three authors, the full title of the work is given: ‘Komentar ustave RS, 2011, p. 43’.
  • When referencing a certain idea without quoting, the source is cited as follows: ‘see P. Jambrek, 2007, p. 123’.
  • The observations of other authors (e.g. T. Jerovšek) cited in the work of another author (e.g. J. Čebulj) can also be cited. In this case, the citation is given for the secondary and not the original source. The name of the original author is given first, followed by ‘IN:’ and the name of the author of the secondary source: ‘T. Jerovšek IN: J. Čebulj, 1998, p. 20’.
  • In general references to a certain author or work, only the name of the author and the year of publication are given: ‘P. Jambrek, 2005’. Such references should be used sparingly.
  • When summarising or paraphrasing the text of another author, the text is not enclosed in quotation marks and is cited as follows: ‘from P. Jambrek, 1998, p. 62’.
  • If multiple works written by the same author and published in the same year are cited, they are ordered alphabetically within the same year by adding a corresponding lowercase letter to the year of publication: ‘P. Jambrek, 1996a, p. 101’.
  • If the name of the author is already included in the signal phrase introducing the paraphrased text, only the year of publication and the page of the source are given: ‘P. Jambrek (2006, p. 307) shares this opinion, claiming that …’
  • When citing laws, regulations, etc., the abbreviation of the law, regulation, etc., is given, followed by the article referenced: ‘ZLS, Article 34’.
  • When citing anonymous sources, such as the Statistical Yearbook (Statistični letopis – SL), the abbreviation or label of the source is given, followed by the year of publication and the page: ‘SL, 1995, p. 57’.
  • When citing sources published online, the same rules as for printed sources (author, year, page) apply wherever possible. As the author or title is often not indicated in online sources, the address of the online source or the name of the holder of the copyrights, moral rights or material rights is given instead.

If no page number is indicated in the online source, it is omitted. At the end of the citation, the note ‘e-source’ is added in parentheses.

  • Sources that were accessed online but are also published in printed form (e.g. a book, article, etc.) should be cited as if the original (printed) version were used.

 

 

3.3 Reference list

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT PUBLICATIONS

This subsection should include publications whose authors are known as well as anonymous publications.

  • If a source has one or more authors, but not more than three, the names of all of the authors are given, separated by commas (author entry).

SURNAME, name, title of work. Place of publication: name of publisher, year of publication.

Example:

NOVAK, Marko, Uvod v pravo. In Nova Gorica: Evropska pravna fakulteta, 2010

 

  • If there are more than three authors, the title of the publication is given (title entry).

TITLE: subtitle/Name and surname of the first author … [et al.]; ed. name and surname. Place of publication: name of publisher, year of publication.

Example:

KOMENTAR Ustave Republike Slovenije: dopolnitev – A/Matej Avbelj … [et al.]; ed. Lovro Šturm. Kranj: Fakulteta za državne in evropske študije, 2011

 

  • If the source is anonymous, the reference begins with the abbreviation (label) and the year of publication of the source (both in parentheses), followed by the title of the source without a comma. If the anonymous source has no abbreviation, the first, parenthetical part is omitted.

Example:

(SL, 1995) Statistični letopis RS. Ljubljana: Statistični urad Republike Slovenije, 1995

 

 

 

ARTICLES IN JOURNALS

Printed versions of articles have priority – if an online article has also been published in a printed version of the journal, then the printed version, the reference list entry should be based on the printed version. If an online article is only published online, it should not be included in this subsection, except for articles in Slovenian or a foreign language published in an electronic scientific journal. Electronic scientific articles are referenced as shown below using the available data. The URL and the date of access are included at the end.

SURNAME, name, title of article. IN: Title of journal. Year of publication, volume number, issue number, pages.

 

Examples:

DJINOVIČ, Marko and GEISLER, Robert, Novi kodeks dobrih poslovnih običajev v prometu z nepremičninami. IN: Pravna praksa. 2011, vol. 30, n. 38, pp. 2–8.

TRATAR, Boštjan, Bistvo prava je uresničevanje pravičnosti v družbi. IN: Polet: magazin Dela in Slovenskih novic. Delo. 2010, vol. 9iloma o vednolja. Kmetijsko gozdarska zbornica Slovenije. URL: na povezavo)atum objave besedila (če je znano). vje. Izjema so z, n. 42, pp. 12–15.

 

DALY, Mary, EU Social Policy after Lisbon. IN: Journal of Common Market Studies (JCMS). 2006, vol. 44, n. 3, p. 461-481. URL: http://eucenter.wisc.edu/OMC/New%20OMC%20links/daly%20social%20policy%20after%20lisbon%20JCMS%202006.pdf DD MMM 2013

* Examples of footnote citations:

  1. Jambrek, 2012, p. 9

from M. Djinovič and R. Geisler, 2011, pp. 4–5

see M. Daly, 2006, p. 472 (e-source)

 

 

CONTRIBUTIONS OR CHAPTERS IN BOOKS OR COLLECTIONS

If the source is a contribution in a book or collection with multiple authors, the surname and name of the author of the contribution or chapter and the title of the contribution are given first. This is followed by ‘IN:’, the title of the book or collection, a slash, and the abbreviation ed. (editor). The place of publication, the name of the publisher and the year of publication are then given, followed by the pages on which the contribution or chapter is printed.

 

SURNAME, name. Title of contribution. IN: Title of publication/ed. name and surname of editor. Place of publication: name of publisher, year of publication. Pp. from–to.

Examples:

* Examples of footnote citations:

  1. Jambrek, 2011, p. 49

see L. Bembič, 2006, pp. 1095–1097

 

LEGAL SOURCES

(Abbreviation of law in brackets) Title of law. Publication, amendments.

Various examples:

– (KZ-1) Kazenskizakonik. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 95/2004, with amendments.
– (OZ) Obligacijskizakonik. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 83/2001, with amendments.
– Odlok o oglaševanju. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 10/2011.
– UNITED Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), with annexes I–VI, Montego Bay, Jamaica, 1982. UL SFRJ – Mednarodne Pogodbe
– 1936 Convention Regarding the Regime of the Straits. URL: http://cil.nus.edu.sg/1936/1936-convention-regarding-the-regime-of-the-straits/DD MMM 2013 (date of access)
– (ZDZdr) ZAKON o duševnem zdravju. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No.77/2008.
– (ZIKS-1) ZAKON o izvrševanju kazenskih sankcij. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 22/2000, with amendments.
– COMMISSION Regulation (EC) No 1737/2005 of 21 October 2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1726/1999 as regards the definition and transmission of information on labour costs. OJ L 279/11, 22 October 2005.
– COUNCIL Directive 75/117/EEC of 10 February 1975 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the application of the principle of equal pay for men and women. OJ L 45, pp. 19–20.

 

COURT CASES

Examples:

Name of decision, order or judgment and type of court, reference number and name of case (if applicable), date of issue. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. __/year.

Name of decision, order or judgment and type of court, reference number and name of case (if applicable), date of issue. URL: __ DD MMM YYYY (date of access)

If the year of issue is already indicated in the reference number, the date of issue may be omitted. If the year in the reference number and the year of issue differ, both should be given. The type of court should not be specified with an abbreviation but should be given in full in the reference list. Only the court case documents actually used in the thesis should be referenced.

 

Examples of various methods of referencing according to the primary source:

  1. JUDGMENT of the Court, ref. no. C-39/72 – Commission v Italy, 7 February 1973. URL: http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=sl&jur=C,T,F&num=c-39/72&td=ALL DD MMM 2013
  2. JUDGMENT of the Court, ref. no. C-31/78 – Bussone. URL: http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=sl&jur=C,T,F&num=c-31/78&td=ALL DD MMM 2013
  3. ORDER of the Koper Higher Court, ref. no. Cp 508/2011. URL:

http://www.sodisce.si/znanje/sodna_praksa/visja_sodisca/2012032113042219/ DD MMM 2013

  1. JUDGMENT of the Administrative Court of the Republic of Slovenia, ref. no. I-U-1778/2011. URL:

http://www.sodisce.si/usrs/odlocitve/2012032113043494/ DD MMM 2013

  1. ORDER of the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Slovenia, ref. no. U-I-236/08 of 4 August 2010. URL:

http://odlocitve.usrs.si/usrs/usodl.nsf/bcaf0777a0b458cac12579c30036ecff/9538932d978faed2c125770a004663f1?OpenDocument DD MMM 2013

  1. ORDER of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Slovenia, ref. no. I-Up-457/2007. URL: http://www.sodisce.si/vsrs/odlocitve/21337/ DD MMM 2013
  2. DECISION of the Ljubljana Higher Court, ref. no. U-I-94/07, 14 February 2007. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, Nos. 45/2007, 21/2008.
  3. DECISION of the Koper Higher Court, ref. no. U-I-130/11, 6 July 2011, 16 February 2012. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, Nos. 60/2011, 16/2012.
  4. DECISION of the Ljubljana Higher Court, ref. no.   U-I-372/06, 13 November 2008. Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 111/2008, Inter-municipal Official Gazette of the Štajerska and Koroška Regions, No. 27/2008.

* Examples of footnote citations:

Decision of the Court, ref. no. C-31/78 – Bussone

Order of the KHC, ref. no. Cp 508/2011

Order of the CCRS, ref. no. U-I-236/08, 4 August 2010

Decision of the KHC, ref. no. U-I-372/06, 13 November 2008

ONLINE SOURCES

In references to works that are only published online, the name of the publisher, place of publication, year of publication and page numbers are replaced with the full web address (URL – Uniform Resource Locator) of the document. The author (if known) is given first, followed by the address of the source and the date of publication (if known). No page numbers are given for online sources, except for PDF documents. The date on which the document was found and accessed is given after the URL.

SURNAME, name, title. Date of online publication (if known). URL: __ DD MMM YYYY (date of access)

 

Examples:

NOVAK, Jure, Klasifikacija slovenskega zračnega prostora; 21 Mar 2010. URL: http://sierra5.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1155 DD MMM 2013.

LAIN, Corinne, Upside-down judicial review; 12 Jan 2012. URL: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1984060 DD MMM 2013.
* Examples of footnote citations: J. Novak, 2010 (e-source); C. Lain, 2012 (e-source)

RAZVOJ podeželja. Kmetijsko gozdarska zbornica Slovenije. URL: http://www.kgzs.si/gv/razvoj-podezelja.aspx DD MMM 2013
* Example of a footnote citation: Razvoj podeželja, 2013 (e-source)

If the author of the work or the holder of the moral copyright is not known, the address of the source and the holder of the material copyright (company, institution, etc.) are given instead.

 

Example:

ESTABLISHING professional and impartial administration. OECD. 25 November 1999.

URL: http://www.oecd.org/puma/sigmweb /acts/act4.htm DD MMM 2013

* Example of a footnote citation: Establishing professional and impartial administration, 1999 (e-source)

 

3.4 List of tables and figures

 

The list of tables and figures should be structured so that the items are listed consecutively in order of their appearance in the text. The consecutive number, title and page number of each figure should be indicated in the list, which should be formatted similarly to the table of contents.

 

Figures are tables, charts, schematics, maps, photographs, diagrams and other materials used by the author to support the text and present complex concepts to the reader more clearly and easily.

 

Tables are systematic arrangements of data on the characteristics of the studied phenomena obtained through collection, grouping and processing. They are suitable for displaying processed numerical data obtained by conducting surveys or experiments or using other data collection methods.

 

Charts are used to clearly illustrate and demonstrate phenomena by means of symbols and geometric shapes. Charts allow the reader to easily see the relationships, correlations and functional connections between the studied data or factors of a process.

 

Schematics are predominantly used in scientific and technical fields. They most often present objects in an orthogonal projection, accompanied by the relevant data and calculations.

 

Maps are special figures that are used predominantly in transport and traffic sciences to illustrate the location of individual countries, roads, routes, etc.

 

Photographs are mainly used in works dealing with transport and traffic to show various vehicles, manipulation equipment, container terminals, sea ports, harbours, etc.

 

Diagrams are used instead of long descriptions to present and demonstrate relationships, complex procedures, phenomena, etc.

 

Pictures

A picture is an area in which an illusion of actual natural phenomena is created through a specific arrangement of shapes and colours. Pictures used in theses should be numbered with consecutive numbers, titled (e.g. ‘Figure 1: Draft certificate of graduation’) and printed in boldface. They should be positioned in the appropriate location within the text and referenced in the text with their respective number (e.g. ‘as shown in Figure 1’). Pictures should be centre-aligned.

Each picture should have:

  • a consecutive number (e.g. Figure 7, Figure 8, etc.),
  • a title printed in boldface lowercase letters,
  • a body (the picture with the data or information),
  • a reference to the source from which the picture was taken or adapted.

If necessary, any notes, abbreviations or symbols that explain, supplement or further clarify the contents of a picture should be included below the body of the picture.

 

Example:

Figure 1: Draft certificate of graduation

Diploma

On 26 January 2009, name and surname of the graduate: Tina SAMPLE

graduated from the undergraduate university study programme in Law

with her diploma thesis entitled: DEVELOPMENT OF LAW IN SLOVENIA,

thereby obtaining the professional title: Bachelor of Law.

European Faculty of Law

Dean:

Source: Janežič (2009, p. 12).

 

If the picture is taken from an external source, the source must be indicated in the title of the picture (see the examples of citation) and the full source must be given in the reference list. Any lines in pictures should be at least 0.5 points thick and the size of any text should be at least 10 points (as shown in the example above).

 

The above instructions for pictures apply with the necessary modifications to tables and other figures. With tables, the head of the table should be positioned at the top in the central part of the table, followed by the body. The contents of individual columns should be indicated in the head (top section) of the table. The text in the head should be centre-aligned and the text of the first column should be left-aligned. The values in the other columns should be right-aligned.

 

Example:

Table 1: Seminar participants in 2008 by area and by sex

female male

linguistics 36 23

organisation 12 54

computer sciences 67 45

economics 11 17

Source: Ravnikar (2008, p. 6).

 

3.5 List of acronyms and abbreviations

The acronyms and abbreviations used in the thesis should be listed alphabetically. The meaning of the acronym or abbreviation should be given next to the acronym or abbreviation.

Example:

ZUP Zakon o splošnem upravnem postopku

3.6 List of Slovenian translations of foreign terms

The language of the terms used should be indicated, followed by a list of terms and their translations in the format ‘term – Slovenian translation’. The list should primarily include foreign terms that are not yet in general use.

Example:

Translations from English

ability test – test sposobnosti

knowledge test – test znanja

 

4 THESIS FORMATTING

4.1 Diploma thesis formatting

4.1.1 Cover page

The lettering ‘EVROPSKA PRAVNA FAKULTETA V NOVI GORICI’ should be printed in uppercase letters at the top centre of the cover page of the diploma thesis. The TITLE OF THE DIPLOMA THESIS should be printed at the centre of the page in uppercase letters. There should be an empty line directly below the title, followed by the type of thesis printed in uppercase letters: DIPLOMSKO DELO. There should be an empty line directly below the type of thesis, followed by the name and surname of the candidate printed in uppercase letters. At the bottom, the place and year of submission of the diploma thesis should be printed in uppercase letters. The font size should be 14 points, except for the title of the thesis, which should be printed in 16-point font.

Examples of for all types of theses:

4.1.2 Title page

The lettering ‘EVROPSKA PRAVNA FAKULTETA V NOVI GORICI’ should be printed in uppercase letters at the top centre of the inner title page of the diploma thesis. The TITLE OF THE DIPLOMA THESIS should be printed at the centre of the page in uppercase letters. There should be an empty line directly below the title, followed by the type of thesis printed in uppercase letters: DIPLOMSKO DELO. In the bottom left section, the text ‘Kandidat(ka):’ should be printed in lowercase letters, followed to the right by the name and surname of the candidate. The candidate’s registration number should be printed below the name of the candidate, followed by the study programme (e.g. ‘Triletni dodiplomski študijski program Pravo 1. Stopnje’ (three-year undergraduate programme in Law) or ‘Triletni dodiplomski študijski program Pravo in management infrastrukture in nepremičnin’ (three-year undergraduate higher professional study programme in Law and Management of Infrastructure and Real Estate)). Below the study programme, the text ‘Mentor:’ should be printed, followed to the right by the academic and professional title and the name and surname of the student’s mentor (e.g. ‘prof. dr. Janez Čebulj’), which should be aligned with the name of the candidate. At the bottom of the page, the place and year of submission of the thesis should be printed. The font size should be 14 points, except for the title of the thesis, which should be printed in 16-point font.

Examples of for all types of theses:

 

EVROPSKA PRAVNA FAKULTETA V NOVI GORICI

 

TITLE OF THESIS

 

DIPLOMSKO DELO

 

Kandidat/-ka: Name and Surname

Vpisna št.:

Štud. program:

Mentor: prof. dr. Name and Surname

 

Place, year

 

4.1.3 Numbering and formatting of diploma thesis section headings

Diploma thesis sections should be numbered using the decimal system, each section being further divided into at least two subsections. It is advisable not to divide sections into too many levels, as this can make the structure unclear (up to four levels are recommended, as shown below).

Example:

1 SECTION, 14 POINTS, UPPERCASE LETTERS, REGULAR, BOLD

1.1 FIRST SUBSECTION, 12 POINTS, UPPERCASE LETTERS, REGULAR, BOLD

12 Second subsection, 12 points, lowercase letters, regular, bold

1.1.1.1 Third and every further subsection, 12 points, lowercase letters, italic, bold

 

The following rules apply in the numbering and formatting of diploma thesis section headings:

  • The heading of each section should be printed at the top of a new page.
  • Subsection headings should always be printed in a new line.
  • Section and subsection headings (as well as pictures, tables, etc.) should be numbered with Arabic numerals.