Sagan, C. (1995). The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark.

Sagan, C. (1995). The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark.

Answer the questions about a book

Project description
Please answer the five questions. The questions are about a book, Sagan, C. (1995). The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. Also, these questions are about only chapter 11. I
Ch.1
1. In Chapter 1, Dr. Sagan introduces us to some of the lines between religion and pseudoscience. Dr. Sagan presents a concept known as the God of the Gaps Theory. What is the God of the Gaps Theory and what evidence would support it throughout human history? (Note that answering this question does not require that you subscribe to the God of the Gaps Theory. Rather, it only requires you to demonstrate that you understand it).
God of the Gaps is that people want to put the existence of God forward by current unexplained scientific explanation. In other words, it means people try to fill prematurely the empty gap in our knowledge by God. It is easy logical error to mistake while overzealous theists are developing discussion with limited knowledge of science.
2. In this chapter, Dr. Sagan presents a quote from Edmund Way Teale concerning the moral implications???? of indifference??? toward the distinction ?? between truth and fiction. Do you agree with the idea of the quote? Why or why not?
I agree with the idea of the quote. For example, if we know that the government is incompetent and corrupted, we are discouraged and disappointed. But, some people do not care and even do not know about that like it is not my business. But that does not mean being unaware the fact is not necessarily better. Being aware and unaware is very different in our society.
3. Dr. Sagan makes a very important distinction in this chapter between erroneous science and pseudoscience. What are the unique characteristics of pseudoscience that distinguish it from erroneous science (Hint: they are also the reasons why pseudoscience is so worrysome a threat to human reasoning.)
Erroneous science is that science improves and develops from errors. But, pseudo science is imprecise, exaggerated, and unverifiable. It also depends on confirmation instead of rebuttal.
4. Dr. Sagan shares with us the breadth? ?? with which pseudoscience has pervaded ????modern society. To emphasize his point, he shares an example of a US president’s reliance?? ?? on entirely unproven?????? superstitious???? practices to guide in his decision making. Who was the president and what was his vice?? ???? Does this scare you? Why or why not?
If the president depends on unproven superstitious practices, his decision is a lack of accuracy and get lost way what the country want to go forward. The citizens feel anxiety and distrust their president.
5. Dr. Sagan uses this chapter to express the gravity?? of the danger that arises??? ???? in a society that cannot—or will not—distinguish???? fact from fiction. But how does this apply to the business world? What do you think some of the dangers might be if leaders managed companies based on instructions from a “Magic 8” ball, or by flipping a “lucky” coin. Are these examples any less credible??? ?? than some othe others that Sagan discusses in the chapter?
In the business world, the leader makes his or her own understandable and reasonable decision. But, it is dangerous that a leader depend on superstition or pseudoscience for the companyís future. Depending on the superstition or pseudoscience is like a gambling. If a leaderís decision from the gambling, the company can develop forward.