RESPONSE TO DANA AVEY DISCUSSION 3

Order Instructions/Description

 

Please note that both length and quality are important considerations when it comes to participation in discussion board and scavenger hunt posts. Posts/responses are expected to reflect critical thinking. You must demonstrate that you have synthesized the materials presented in the articles/websites and that you are relating your posts/responses to materials covered in class and/or the greater literature available. To earn full credit, you must add something of substance to the discussion — this consists of new ideas, your perspectives, specific follow-up questions, and relevant references. All posts/responses should integrate the new information with the information previously reviewed in the course.

All posts/responses/comments must be at least 300 words. Substantive initial posts include at least one in-text citation of references provided from the course materials. Response posts to your classmates (due on Sundays at 11:59pm) do not require references, but must be at least 300 words. Scavenger Hunt posts must reference at least the assignment website. Please proofread your posts carefully, as grammar and spelling errors will impact your grade. References must be in APA 6th edition format.
Please note that both length and quality are important considerations when it comes to participation in discussion board and scavenger hunt posts. Posts/responses are expected to reflect critical thinking. You must demonstrate that you have synthesized the materials presented in the articles/websites and that you are relating your posts/responses to materials covered in class and/or the greater literature available. To earn full credit, you must add something of substance to the discussion — this consists of new ideas, your perspectives, specific follow-up questions, and relevant references. All posts/responses should integrate the new information with the information previously reviewed in the course.

HERE IS DANA AVEY DISCUSSION TO BE RESPONDED TO.

A number of reasons have been proposed over the years as to why individuals with psychiatric and substance use disorders tend to avoid or not access the specialty mental health system for care. One of the most commonly reported issues is simply the lack of access to services. This is generally attributable to factors such as “shortages of mental health care providers, health plan barriers, and lack of coverage or inadequate coverage” (Cunningham, 2014, p. 1).

Another noted concern is the fragmented nature of mental health treatment and care. It can be difficult for those who are impaired with psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders to sufficiently navigate the referral steps to get from point A to point B within the treatment setting. Furthermore, the tedious tasks required of individuals to gain entry into said referrals often leaves them feeling overwhelmed or allows for enough time to relapse or decompensate. Some states have pushed for a concept known as open access, such as Georgia, where individuals are able to walk in for services and be seen the same day. While this is working in theory, in the sense they are seen the same day, it is often for an intake and does not allow for them to actually be seen by a psychiatrist. It can take an additional 30 or more days thereafter to actually get in to see the doctor, therapist, etc.

In addition, a stigma remains prevalent surrounding psychiatric conditions and substance use causing many to shy away from treatment resources out of shame or fear of judgement. There is a lack of understanding by many, as it relates to psychiatric disorders and the dependency upon substances. Wang, Lane, Olfson, Pincus, Wells, and Kessler (2005) report that low presentation of some individuals with psychiatric and/or substance use disorders “may reflect diminished perceived needs for treatment on the part of patients and tendencies for patients and providers to view these problems as social or criminal rather than medical” (p. 635).

Cunningham, P.J. (2009). Beyond parity: Primary care physicians’ perspectives on access to mental health care. Health Affairs, 28(3), w490-w501.

Wang, P.S., Lane, M., Olfson, M., Pincus, H.A., Wells, K.B., et al. (2005). Twelve-month use of mental health services in the United States: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62(6), 629-640