Middle east

Middle east

Acceptable academic/scholarly secondary sources will be defined as being either articles published in peer reviewed journals or books that are based on research, contain citations and a bibliography (if in doubt see attached criteria provided by the University of Sydney), Please avoid Wikipedia and other non-academic sources.
Your paper should include an accurate and relevant bibliography.
You must demonstrate correct use of a citation and referencing style.
You must use evidence from at least four primary and/or secondary sources; one of these sources should be a published source from the library. You will be assessed on evidence of close reading of your sources.
MINIMUM: 3 Pages
Part One: 50 marks
1)    In-class assignment:
a)      Read the extract below and summarize the text.
b)      Write an hypothesis that states whether you agree or disagree with the main ideas in the text.
c)
d)    Extracts from: ‘Middle East’ Is Pulled Towards Asia by Economics and Affinity by Afshin Molavi, New American Foundation, 25 May 2011for The National
The old and none-too-precise term “Middle East” disguises the growing reality of ties between this region (most notably the GCC states) and fast-growing economies and societies in Asia. A more precise term for this region would be West Asia.
This newspaper [The National], is published in Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates, a city in the Middle East. Why is that so? Because an early 20th century American naval strategist decided it would be so – not the part about the newspaper or the city, but the region’s name: the Middle East.
There is a problem with this regional name, however, particularly in regard to the GCC countries. While it only marginally captures a sense of the political geography of the region (the world can look a lot different from Marrakech to Muscat), it fails entirely to capture the region’s commercial geography or its cultural geography of historic intermingling with India, Iran and even China in the early years of Islam. But more relevant to today, GCC trade with Asia far surpasses trade with the Arab world.
In that sense, the GCC states might better be considered part of West Asia, which is technically the case. This will be even more relevant in the decades to come as East Asia and South Asia – especially China and India – emerge as the GCC’s largest trade partners. A new Economist Intelligence Unit report notes that Asia will be the biggest GCC trading partner by 2017. By that time, it will account for a greater volume of trade than the industrialised, western-heavy Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries.
Western commentators have taken to calling the 21st century “the Asian century”. By this, they usually mean the rise of China and India combined with the steady growth of the Asian tigers like South Korea and Singapore alongside emerging Asian economies like Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines and Indonesia. But “the Asian century” needs oil and gas to fuel its growth, and that’s where West Asia comes in. Already, the GCC sends more oil to Asia than anywhere else in the world, and energy-hungry China and India will increasingly rely on GCC producers to fuel their growth stories. There will be no “Asian century” without West Asian oil producers. Furthermore, massive investments in value-added industries such as petrochemicals, steel and plastics across the GCC hinge on rising demand in Asia.
But the story is growing deeper than just manufactured goods from Asia landing in the GCC and petroleum-based products calling on East Asian ports. GCC sovereign wealth funds have become significant investors in emerging Asia, and the growing Asian middle classes, especially from China, are flocking to tourist cities like Dubai and Abu Dhabi. There is also growing academic exchange. At the newly launched King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia, the largest contingent of foreign students are not Arabs or Europeans, but Chinese, while GCC states are sending record numbers of students to study in China.
A glance at the arrivals and departures boards at GCC airports also reveals the Asian ties. A dizzying array of cities from India to China to Thailand glimmer across the boards, carrying tourists, businessmen, labourers or simply long-haul travellers changing flights – the GCC truly has become a “middle” hub between Asia and the West for flights.
The rise of Asia just might be one of the most consequential geoeconomic and geopolitical trends since the 19th century Industrial Revolution lifted Europe and the United States to economic prominence. The growing ties between West Asia and East Asia will drive this growth. It’s time we put a forward-looking commercial geographic lens on and put aside the tired geographical misnomer of a long deceased imperial strategist.

Write an essay that provides a well-argued opinion, based on research, that either supports or argues against your original hypothesis.
You must use evidence from at least four primary and/or secondary sources; one of these sources should be a published source from the library. You will be assessed on evidence of close reading of your sources.
Acceptable academic/scholarly secondary sources will be defined as being either articles published in peer reviewed journals or books that are based on research, contain citations and a bibliography (if in doubt see attached criteria provided by the University of Sydney), Please avoid Wikipedia and other non-academic sources.
Your paper should include an accurate and relevant bibliography.
You must demonstrate correct use of a citation and referencing style.

All papers must be submitted to Safe Assign
Late papers will be penalized.

University of Sydney Library,
Scholarly v non-scholarly sources
Michael Arndell and Tom Goodfellow

WHAT IS A SCHOLARLY RESOURCE?
In your assignments you will be required to use the most scholarly material possible to support your arguments.
Scholarly means written by qualified academic experts and supported by research and references.
You can test whether a resource is scholarly by applying the REVIEW criteria:
R – Relevance
E – Expertise of Author
V – Viewpoint of Author/Organisation
I – Intended Audience
E – Evidence
W – When Published

THE REVIEW CRITERIA
R is for Relevance
? How relevant is the resource to your topic or question?
? Does the resource provide a broad overview, or does it relate to just one aspect of your topic/question?
? Have you read a variety of sources to determine whether this one is useful?
E is for Expertise of Author
? What is the educational background of the author?
? Is this topic in the author’s area of expertise?
? Are they regularly cited by the other authors in the field?
V is for Viewpoint of Author/Organisation
? Is the author or organisation associated with a particular view or position?
? What is the purpose of the resource? (is it intended to inform? To persuade? To entertain?)
I is for Intended Audience
? Who is the intended audience for the resource?
? Is the resource at the appropriate level for your needs – is it too basic or too technical?
E is for Evidence
? Has the author cited appropriate evidence to back up their theories/conclusions?
? Is there a bibliography or reference section? (this may contain further useful resources)
? Has the resource been through the peer review process?
W is for When Published
? When was the resource published?
? Is the information still current, or have there been further developments in the topic area?

Scholarly Vs non-scholarly resources
What will happen if you apply the REVIEW test to this textbook?

Singer, S. Fred.
Unstoppable global warming : every 1,500 years.
Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2007.

Relevance: Excellent. There is lots of useful information in the book.
Expertise: Very good. The author works at two well-known universities and the publisher is respected.
Viewpoint: Challenging. Disputes prevailing scientific views of climate change.
Intended audience: Good. University students and researchers.
Evidence: Excellent. The author cites in-depth scientific evidence.
When published: Good. Published recently.
Would you use this textbook as a scholarly resource?
The REVIEW criteria clearly demonstrate that this is a scholarly work.

Would you use this peer reviewed journal article as a scholarly resource for
this assignment?

Marcel E. Visser
“Keeping up with a warming world; assessing the rate of adaptation to climate change”
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Series B: Biological Sciences
Volume 275, Number 1635 / March 22, 2008
Special Issue ‘Evolutionary dynamics of wild populations’ compiled and edited by Loeske
E. B. Kruuk and William G. Hill

Relevance: Deals with the effects of global warming on the evolution of animal species
Expertise: Scholarly affiliation of the author is given. The research is original.
Viewpoint: Objective, as the article has gone through a peer review process
Intended audience: Aimed at scholarly researchers, including students and academics
Evidence: Superb. The article was subject to peer review checking before publication and contains
extensive references. However you should still research the alternate point of view.
When published: Recent research on the topic
Would you use this journal article as a scholarly resource?
Peer reviewed journal articles are the most scholarly material available

Relevance: Very good. It’s an article specifically about global warming, covering a range of issues in a
structured way.
Expertise: Unknown. Anybody can edit Wikipedia, so you don’t know who wrote the information.
Viewpoint: The article aims to reach a consensus for approach and neutrality, but this may not be
represented at any given moment, as the site is changing constantly.
Intended audience: Provided for the general public, but contains a large amount of scientific data.
Evidence: There is extensive referencing, Wikipedia articles often refer to more authoritative sources,
but the references need to be verified.
When published: Superb. Wikipedia is updated constantly.
Would you use this Wikipedia article as a scholarly resource?
Wikipedia articles are not scholarly, because we don’t know the qualifications of the author. However,
they can be a good source of further reading.