Humanities

Humanities

Order Description

In Chapter 23, Watson begins to tell the story of the scientific revolution. Of course, the Greeks knew a great deal about scientific observation, evidence, etc. Watson notes that Francis Bacon (and later Descartes) articulated the rules by which science works. Indeed, these thinkers put observation first, prescribed ways of dissecting problems, and eschewed mysterious or unexplained forces. Given this, as Watson notes, such figures as Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo (all of him risked their lives- and some gave them) did not just make astronomical discoveries, but also authored inventions (e.g. the telescope and microscope). Moreover, Watson notes, Vesalius and William Harvey finally started detail how our heart and blood worked, which allowed quick advances in medicine. Moreover, Leeuwenhoek discovered small creatures, such as bacteria. Perhaps most importantly, though, was Sir Isaac Newton, whom, goaded by Edmund Halley, wrote the Principia Mathematica, and also discovered how optics work. Indeed, it is no exaggeration to say that most of what we use, value, and just take for granted today (everything from the elevator, to the mobile phone, to medicines for depression) owes its existence indirectly to these individuals.

  1. In what ways do the religious Catholic or Protestant theologians literally think differently than the scientific thinkers (e.g. Bacon, Newton, etc.)? Of course, this question is meant to make you think about ideas, as such. More specifically, how has the advent of science been an advance?

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