Ethnic identity and human rights in Iran

Project description
Ethnic identity and human rights in Iran

Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 National diversity in Iran.
Iran’s main ethnic groups
Persians
Turks
Kurds
Arabs
Turkmen
Bloch
Chapter 3 Violation of human rights in Iran
national or ethnic discrimination
Religious discrimination
political discrimination
discrimination based on the difference between men and women
discrimination based on economic and social status
Chapter 4 The persecution of Ahwazi Arab people as an example for ethnic group persecution in Iran
Control of Ahwaz province and its aftermath
Confiscation of Arab lands policy
Intensify its military presence in the region
Eliminate political activists and physically liquidated
Ahwazi Arab people and cultural persecution
Chapter 5 Conclusion

The aim of this paper is to discuss the highly centralized political management and ignorance of the participation of ethnic groups in Iran, ignorance their demands and needs in the wake of modernization movement and also lack of political, economic and social equality among these groups. Furthermore it will look at inequality in human rights and human development between the ethnic groups in Iran and the rights of the woman which is straying multiplier persecution by the central government on the one hand and Ethnic Traditions on the other.
Iran is creating one of the most important strategic locations and is the connection point between Central Asia and the sources of oil and water in Middle East. Neighbouring from the north and northeast Afghanistan and Turkmenistan and from the north-west and west both Azerbaijan and Armenia, and from the west Turkey and Iraq and from the East Pakistan and from the south Arabian Gulf countries, where it has a joint naval border with Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain. Iran is the second country after Saudi Arabia for oil reserves in the region. According to the statistics in 1999 Iran population reaches 70 million people.
It is still not clear for many countries of the world and active human rights organizations that Iran is multination country and that because of the powerful propaganda systems successive helm of government in Iran. Political considerations also believe that Iran is a homogeneous ethnic country, whether in terms of linguistic identity or culture, social and religion. While the reality shows that Iran is a multi-ethnic and multicultural country even in terms of religion.
Arabs, Azeri Turks, Kurds, and Balochi rights are a huge issue in Iran. The central government during the reign of Reza Shah Pahlavi (1925 -1941) has been implemented persianization policy and sought for the smelting of national minorities within its own vision of the state of the Iranian nation. Reza Shah has used military force to suppress and subdue minorities, and the prohibition of non-Persian writing in Persian language and made it the only national language in Iran. The establishment of a central and modernizing government by raze shah in 1925 and his idea of national culture based on official language which is Persian, banned all other ethnic group languages from official use and from the educational sphere. The new Islamic government of Iran also failed to change anything from shah Era, when minorities were oppressed to the fullest extent and Persian totalitarianism was at its peak.
The Ahwazi Arabs have been campaigned for decades for their national and cultural rights. Their struggle however has been part of the wider struggle of Iranian people and all other ethnic and national minorities in Iran although unfortunately their role has not been fully recognised. They had actively participated in the 1979 revolution, hoping that the new regime would recognise and guarantee their legitimate rights and fulfil their aspiration. Yet the new Islamic regime not only denied the Ahwazi Arabs and other ethnic groups their legitimate rights, but also started a campaign of execution, torture and violence against them.