Data Analysis

A study performed by a Columbia University professor (descried in Report on Business, august 1991) counted the number of times per minute professors from three different departments said “uh” or “ah” during lectures to fill gaps between words. The data derived from observing 100 minutes from each of the three departments were recorded. If we assume that the more frequent use of “uh” or “ah” results in more boring lectures, can we conclude that some departments’ professors were more boring than others? Data recorded below:

English
Mathematics
Political Science

4
1
5

9
8
4

8
4
9

7
6
5

4
7
5

4
8
5

8
5
6

7
4
4

9
4
5

0
5
5

7
0
4

4
2
0

7
6
6

8
6
7

4
6
4

4
3
3

7
5
3

5
5
6

0
4
7

3
4
4

3
4
5

1
9
1

3
8
8

3
5
9

4
8
5

7
7
9

10
1
4

8
6
7

7
7
0

5
3
9

1
5
5

5
5
6

3
7
4

4
1
5

5
7
5

10
5
6

5
3
5

8
8
5

4
5
3

4
4
4

4
5
5

9
7
6

5
6
4

9
5
3

5
3
8

7
4
3

3
5
5

8
8
7

10
7
8

4
6
8

8
5
6

11
5
7

5
4
3

7
6
8

4
8
3

8
3
6

5
9
5

8
6
4

3
8
4

7
6
6

8
7
4

8
2
8

7
3
3

7
5
6

5
2
8

4
5
4

10
5
7

4
4
7

5
7
6

4
6
8

4
7
2

4
4
7

4
9
2

7
9
6

10
6
4

7
5
8

2
9
2

5
2
6

5
8
6

5
7
5

8
4
5

8
3
3

10
6
4

5
4
2

9
5
6

1
5
7

7
7
4

8
4
5

5
6
8

7
1
5

7
3
4

9
7
8

8
6
6

5
6
8

8
5
7

1
6
6

5
5
5

7
5
7

7
8
5

2
5
8

NOTE Frequent use of “uh” and “ah” could signify nervousness, a lack of rehearsal, or speaking without a memorized script, it should not automatically mean the professor is boring. However, it serves as a distractor. It could be annoying, and unappealing. The listener will be so attuned to each “ah” and “uh” that he or she will focus on that, and away from the lecture itself. That could lead to the belief that the lecture is boring.