Bill of Rights

In Ch. 2 of Working With People, the author lists a “Bill of Rights” as a guide for the human services professional.

Use the “Bill of Rights” as a guide. create one right each for the human services professional, the human services client, and the relationship between the professional and the client.

Create a 10- to 12-slide Microsoft® PowerPoint® presentation. Include the following:

  • Provide an introduction.
  • Explain why you chose your rights and why they are important to the professional, the client, and the relationship between the two.
  • Identify how each of your rights can contribute to the development of a useful guide to human services professionals.
  • Provide a conclusion.
  • Add speaker notes

Format your presentation consistent with APA guidelines.

Click the Assignment Files tab to submit your assignment.

Figure 2.2 A Bill of Rights (based on material taken from a workshop on assertiveness training by Patricia Jakubowski-Spector, July 1974, University of Maryland). There are almost as many bills of rights as there are people working in this area, each with its own particular emphasis. All emphasize the right of the individual to be oneself, to be different, to self-express, and to be treated with respect and consideration. Most of them emphasize an equally basic essential, the responsibility to extend the same rights to others. This older bill covers these fundamentals and is still relevant today.

A Bill of Rights

  1. You have the right to refuse requests from others without feeling selfish or guilty.
  2. You have the right to feel and express anger and other emotions.
  3. You have the right to feel healthy competitiveness.
  4. You have the right to use your judgment in deciding your own needs.
  5. You have the right to make mistakes.
  6. You have the right to have your opinions and ideas given the same respect and considerations others have.
  7. You have the right to ask for consideration, help, and/or affection from others.
  8. You have the right to be treated as an adult.
  9. You have the right to tell others what your needs are.

 

  1. You have the right on some occasions to make demands on others.