Benefits of Practicing Meditation

Writing a Classical Argument Essay
• Produce a thoughtful, logically structured, and well-researched argument;
• Show evidence of engagement with a timely topic and research question;
• Use secondary sources that are effective for the chosen audience and rhetorical purpose;
• Document secondary research (both in-text and in Works Cited) correctly according to a specified citation style;
• Use appropriately summary, paraphrase, and direct quotations to support and develop claims;
• Employ rhetorical appeals effectively;
• Produce a final draft that shows evidence of a thoughtful writing process, including invention, revision, and editing;
• Use syntax, punctuation, and spelling effectively in service of rhetorical purpose and to support the writer’s ethos.

Instructions: Write a formal persuasive paper that solves the “perplexing problem” you developed in the Exploratory and Informative Essay and the Research Proposal. Be sure to establish yourself as a credible author by using an appropriate tone and voice. Include at least one major piece of primary research (original interview, email or letter from an expert, questionnaire/survey, etc.). Be sure to make your thesis (position) clear and decisive from the beginning and maintain that stance consistently throughout the paper. You must link reasons to your claim that you develop throughout the rest of the argument.
Remember to use specific examples, facts, quotations, anecdotes, statistics, images, charts, etc., to back up your general claims. Also, be sure to include a fully developed counterargument section, during which you present—then refute or concede to—any opposing views. Finally, MLA format should be used, with sources cited appropriately both within the body of the essay and in a Works Cited page that concludes the piece.