Assessment Checklist You should:

Assessment Checklist You should:

1) Choose one of the two topics listed below.
2) Engage with relevant themes and ideas from the lectures and tutorial discussions.
3) Cite your sources by employing either Harvard, MLA, or Chicago documentation style. Additional research, beyond the relevant chapter from Bennett and Royle, is not required but optional.
4) Organize the analysis around a central argument or “thesis” and provide textual evidence to support its claims.
5) Employ an appropriate writing style with minimal spelling, grammatical, or other errors.
6) Create your own arguments and thesis, there is examples if you scroll down.. Please be sure that you use Bennet and Royle chapters for the topics otherwise I will fail the assessment.. For example for topic 1: you can either use chapter “ghosts or uncanny”.
7) Please do not use plot summary but focus on the question, I cannot afford to fail this assessment. There are examples of thesis below to give you an idea.
The quotations given before each question below are only there to guide you; you do not need to employ them if they are not relevant to your argument. You are encouraged to use additional textual examples to support your claims.
Topic 1
“Some things go. Pass on. Some things just stay. I used to think it was my rememory. You know. Some things you forget. Other things you never do. But it’s not. Places, places are still there. If a house burns down, it’s gone, but the place—the picture of it—stays, and not just in my rememory, but out there, in the world. What I remember is a picture floating around out there outside my head. I mean, even if I don’t think it, even if I die, the picture of what I did, or knew, or saw is still out there. Right in the place where it happened” (43).
“As long as the ghost showed out from its ghostly place shaking stuff, crying, smashing and such—Ella respected it. But if it took flesh and came in her world, well, the shoe was on the other foot. She didn’t mind a little communication between the two worlds, but this was an invasion” (302).
Engaging with relevant ideas from the “Racial Difference” chapter, as well as either “Ghosts” or “The Uncanny” in Bennett and Royle, answer the following question: How does Morrison’s representation of the ghost in Beloved challenge racial hierarchies?

Topic 2
“The gap between Africa and Afro-America and the gap between the living and the dead and the gap between the past and the present does not exist. It’s bridged for us by our assuming responsibility for people no one’s ever assumed responsibility for. They are those that died en route. Nobody knows their names, and nobody thinks about them. . . . There is a necessity for remembering the horror, but of course there’s a necessity for remembering it in a manner in which it can be digested, in a manner in which the memory is not destructive.
“1 “This is not a story to pass on” (324).
Engaging with relevant ideas from the “History” and “Racial Difference” chapters from Bennett and Royle, answer the following question: What does Beloved suggest about the responsibility of contemporary readers to remember the history of American slavery?

Instructions on Constructing a Thesis for your Essay:
Your Thesis/Argument should be a disputable claim. This means that other people can potentially disagree with it. If no one can disagree with your argument, then it is not a real argument.
An academic thesis or argument is not quite the same as an “argument” that you might have with a friend. An academic argument does not need to involve an angry, heated exchange between two people. However, an argument in the everyday sense of the term shares with an academic argument the common characteristic of being disputable and debatable.
Bad Thesis: Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice is phallocentric. This assertion is too general and does not supply any justification for the writer’s interpretation.
Better Thesis: Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice is phallocentric because Portia must follow her father’s guidelines for choosing a suitor. This is better because you can imagine some readers disagreeing and it provides a clear justification (“because”) for the writer’s position. It is a bit simplistic, however, because it completely disregards how Portia guides Bassanio toward choosing her, the masculine role she assumes in the trial, etc..
Good Thesis: Portia may be constrained by the phallocentric rules of her father, but the play itself is not phallocentric because it allows Portia to employ some amount of female agency. This is much more specific than the previous example and more thoughtful. It makes a clear distinction between the phallocentrism of a character (Portia’s father) and that of a play. It implies that a text has agency that it can reinforce or challenge existing norms. In order to prove this thesis, the writer would need to give specific examples that illustrate Portia’s female agency.