Argument Paper

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Writing Project 4: Argument Paper

 

Overview:

For this assignment, you will build off the same topic used in the Writing Project 3 AND the core reading I give to you.  Your purpose is to take a position on the issue or problem you in Writing Project 3 and to make a case for a claim about the topic/problem that will influence a reasonably skeptical audience to make argument paper

 

Core reading:

http://comosr.spps.org/Alexie.html.

 

 

you should have 200 with cover letter about Effective cover letter, describing peer feedback and explaining how peer feedback was implemented (because I DID not have feedback, you can just explain what you want)

 

 

 

and  1500 for final argument paper

If you still want to more imformation, you can go to our online course website:

 

www.online.ivyteche.edu

 

And the course called: eng 111

 

 

 

 

 

WRITING PROJECT 4: Argument

Description & Steps

Consult CHAPTER 13 of Writing: Ten Core Concepts to develop and complete your project. (You may also need to consult CHAPTER 3, as directed by the steps in CHAPTER 13.) Below are specific details related to this project to consider as you progress through each core writing concept.
1
Explore
the topic
For this project, you will return to the problem, issue, or controversy you researched and wrote about for Writing Project 3. Only this time, you will a take a stand on that problem, issue, or controversy, arguing in order to accomplish one or more of the following:

  • “to Solve a Problem” by advocating a course of action you think should be taken in response to it (Yagelski 317)
  • “to Assert a Position” by supporting a particular view you hold on the issue (317-318)
  • “to Inquire” more deeply into the controversy and advocate for a more reasonable solution, resolution, or conclusion to the debate which all parties can agree with (318)
  • “to Prevail” by opposing and refuting a set of viewpoints on the issue or controversy that you disagree with (318-319)

In this project, your purpose is to persuade your audience, convincing them to accept your view (or least accept that your view is reasonable) or to take the course of action you are endorsing (or at least recognize it as credible and worthwhile).

Step 1 of CHAPTER 13 will guide you as you continue to refine your opinions on the problem, issue, or controversy you are addressing. Besides CHAPTER 13, you should also consult your Working Outline; Learning Activities in Class Sessions 12, 13, and 14; and the Session 11 & Session 12 Discussion on thesis statements to deepen your thinking and prepare for your first draft.

2
Examine rhetorical context
For this project, you will select a relevant audience based on the problem, issue, or controversy you are writing about and the stance you are taking on it. Depending on your subject matter and the argument you are making, this may be the same audience you wrote to in WP3; an academic audience, such as your instructor and other members of the class (as discussed in CHAPTER 12); or a public audience outside an academic setting (as discussed in CHAPTER 13). Whatever audience you choose, you should consider the following questions about audience:

  • Who has a stake in this issue? Who would care about your position on this issue?
  • Who do you think can benefit from hearing your arguments about the issue?
  • Who do you think needs to be made aware of the issue and your viewpoint on it?
  • Who do you think is impacted by the problem or issue that would like to hear that someone is on their side?
  • Who you do you want to persuade or convince of the view or course of action you are advocating?

To develop a rhetorical context for this project, specifically describe your Time, Place, and Purpose from Step 2 in CHAPTER 3. In addition, consider the questions above as you explore and describe possible audiences for your Argument, using Step 2 in Chapter 13 as a guide. What you write for Step 2 will be your situation analysis, which you will submit as part of your first draft, due in Class Session 13. See Assignment Specifics, below, for information on writing the situation analysis.

 

 

3
Select a medium
Your medium for this project will be a formal academic manuscript and must meet the guidelines listed below. Instruction on these guidelines can be found in CHAPTERS 24 or 25 of our textbook and at the Purdue OWL website (links in Resources).

  • minimum 1500 words for the final draft; both drafts double-spaced in 12-point Times New Roman font
  • Formatted according to either APA or MLA style (as specified by your instructor)
  • Use of correct in-text citations of any ideas or information borrowed from sources
  • A formal list of all sources (a References list for APA or a Works Cited list for MLA) used, following APA or MLA style.
4
Have something
to say
Step 4 of CHAPTER 13 will guide you as you refine the thesis statement from your Working Outline, with the purpose of clearly articulating your central claim or argument to your specific audience. Note that your thesis statement must take a stand on the issue, problem, or controversy you address, expressing your focused, debatable, and supportable view on some aspect of the problem or controversy.
5
Back up what you say
In this step, you will begin to write a first draft for this project, due in Class Session 13. This draft isn’t complete, though, until you’ve applied ideas you developed in Step 6.

In the Working Outline, you have already begun to select evidence to support your view. Step 5 in CHAPTER 13 will guide you as you continue to re-examine the evidence you previously selected and find additional evidence to build your arguments and support your thesis statement. Much of this evidence may come from the sources in your Annotated Bibliography and the sources you used in WP3. But you may also need to find new credible and relevant sources beyond those you’ve already collected. No print sources may be used without instructor approval, but additional sources may be found through the Ivy Tech Library databases or through some other means (highly credible and authoritative open Web sources, videos or podcasts, documentaries or news programs, personal interviews, core readings from the Core Readings folder, etc.).

Step 5 in CHAPTER 13 will also guide you as you develop a counterargument. You must include at least one counterargument in your project, in which accurately present at least one viewpoint or claim in opposition to your stance and effectively refute that claim, using sound reasoning and valid evidence.

Overall, you must use at least 5 sources, at least 4 of which are found from the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases. You may certainly use (and may well need) more than 5 sources. Use at least 10 quotations and/or paraphrases from your sources, cited using correct APA or MLA in-text citations (as specified by your instructor). In your essay, material from your sources should be discernible from each other, and your own writing voice should be discernible from those of the sources.

6
Establish form and structure
In the Working Outline, you have already begun to develop an organization for this draft. This step, though, will guide you as you refine your organizational strategy based on your rhetorical situation and your refined thesis statement.

TURN IT IN: After you have applied your organizational strategy to your first draft, you’re ready to submit your situation analysis and first draft in Class Session 13. See Assessment Specifics, below, for information on completing and turning in the first draft and situation analysis.

7
Get feedback
Students will conduct peer response in Class Session 14, where you will find instructions on how to conduct peer response.

After you receive feedback from your peers in class, you will need to review this feedback and develop a strategy for how to apply that feedback to a revision of your first draft.

8
Revise
Follow this step to revise your first draft. Keep in mind that your revision of the first draft should incorporate peer response feedback you received from your peers as well as guidance offered in Step 8 of CHAPTER 13.

Along with your final draft, you will submit a cover letter, describing and explaining the feedback you received from your peers and how you revised your first draft based on that feedback and on Step 8. See Assignment Specifics, below, for information on writing the cover letter.

9
Strengthen your voice
In this step, you will think about and make changes to your draft based on language choices: developing your voice, tone, and writing style in the draft. CHAPTER 19 of Writing: Ten Core Concepts offers a number of stylistic considerations. These kinds of changes may also be discussed in your cover letter.
10
Make it correct
In this step, you will look for errors in grammar, punctuation, and spelling and correct them. You will also look to confirm that you correctly cited your sources and correctly formatted your draft according to APA or MLA style and make any necessary corrections. Do NOT discuss these kinds of changes in your cover letter.

TURN IT IN: After you applied this step, you’re ready to submit your cover letter and final draft in Class Session 15. See Assessment Specifics, below, for information on completing and turning in the final draft and cover letter.

 

 

 

WRITING PROJECT 4: Argument

Assessment Specifics & Grading Rubrics

The following provides specific information for completing and submitting your project assignments – the situation analysis and first draft, due in Class Session 13, and the cover letter and final draft, due in Class Session 15.

 

FINAL DRAFT – Due in Class Session 15 (170 points)
1. Cover Letter Specifics
  • Minimum 200 words (successful cover letters are often longer)
  • Address letter to your instructor
  • Describe and explain feedback you received from your peers and how you revised your first draft based on that feedback
  • Describe and explain content you have changed to address Step 8 above, to improve the composition, and to appeal to your audience
  • Discuss any problems you encountered in your revisions and how you solved them
  • Place the cover letter at the beginning of your first draft, before the first page of your actual composition; delete the situation analysis
2. Final Draft Specifics
  • An essay taking a stand and making arguments in support of a view or course of action on the issue, problem, or controversy developed in Writing Project 3.
  • Clearly focused, debatable, and supportable thesis statement advocating your view on the problem or controversy
  • Use of evidence from sources, objectively and accurately interpreted
  • Effective reasoning that demonstrates how the evidence supports the thesis and the specific arguments being made
  • Opposing views that are accurately presented and effectively refuted with reasons and evidence
  • A logical organizational structure that clearly and effectively guides readers through the arguments being made
  • Use of evidence from sources (at least 10 quotations and/or paraphrases), clearly discernible from each other and from the writer’s voice and cited using correct in-text citations
  • Use of at least 5 relevant and highly credible sources, at least 4 from the Ivy Tech Library databases. (No Print Sources.)
  • APA or MLA manuscript style, as specified by your instructor, with in-text citations and a References or Works Cited list including ALL sources used. (References or Works Cited list does not count in the minimum word-count requirement)
  • Awareness of diverse audiences and use of respectful, inclusive language
  • Observation of the conventions of Standard English
  • 1500 words minimum for final draft (the minimum 200 words for the cover letter is not included in this count)
Final Draft Rubric  

Criteria Description Points
Cover Letter Effective cover letter, describing peer feedback and explaining how peer feedback was implemented 15
Thesis Clearly focused, debatable, and supportable thesis statement advocating your view on the problem or controversy 15
Introduction/

Conclusion

Introduction provides context for the position being argued and strives to be relevant to the intended audience. Conclusion effectively summarizes the content and conveys the significance of the central thesis to the audience. 15
Organization Organization is supported with helpful and effective transitions and with coherent arrangement. 15
Effective Argument Strategies Effective support of thesis with good reasoning, relevant and sufficient evidence, and varied persuasive appeals (ethical, emotional, logical) as appropriate to the purpose and audience. Reasoning and evidence used attempts to convince readers of the validity of the writer’s position or at least convince them that a reasonable person could hold this view. Avoidance of logical fallacies. Writer establishes a credible ethos as someone informed on the topic, trustworthy, knowledgeable, and arguing in good faith. 30
Counter-argument and Rebuttal Important opposing positions are fairly and accurately acknowledged. Counterarguments based on reasons and evidence are offered. 10
Sources and citations Use of at least 5 relevant and credible sources, at least 4 found using the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases. No print sources. Use of at least 10 quotes or paraphrases from sources. Evidence is effectively and accurately represented and cited using correct APA or MLA in-text citations. Sources are discernible from each other and the writer’s voice is discernible from those of the sources. 20
Style Voice, tone, and stance are appropriate and effective for material, purpose, and audience. Style is clear, consistent, and cohesive, appealing appropriately to the intended audience. Language used demonstrates awareness of diverse audiences. Respectful language is used when discussing cultural differences. 20
Conventions Clear control of language conventions with few distracting typos or errors 15
Document style Correct document format in APA or MLA style, as specified by your instructor, including correct References page (APA) or Works Cited page (MLA) 15
  TOTAL
NOTE: Proportional points may be deducted for final drafts that do not meet minimum word counts.
170 points