Are Today's Youth More Self-Centered Than Previous Generations?

Are Today’s Youth More Self-Centered Than Previous Generations?

Introduction
The purpose of this critical thinking assignment is to examine both sides of a controversial issue, select a position, apply it to a multicultural context, and to apply the Park University General Education literacies: aesthetic, civic, critical, science, and values. Two of these literacies (critical and values) are perceived to cut across disciplines and departments, while the other three (aesthetic, civic, and scientific) literacies address major academic concerns. Students with these literacies should be able to succeed in communicating, computing and problem-solving, clarifying values, using the arts, functioning within social institutions, and using the sciences and technology.
Directions
For your paper, please select a topic from a Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Psychological Issues book. In the event that you do not have access to the Taking Sides book, please open the following document and examine the list of topics in the book.
Taking Side on Psych Issues (17th ed):
Issue 7. Are Today’s Youth More Self-Centered Than Previous Generations?, 114
YES: Jean M. Twenge, et al., from “Egos Inflating Over Time: A Cross-Temporal Meta-Analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory,” Journal of Personality (August 2008), 116
NO: Kali H. Trzesniewski, et al., from “Do Today’s Young People Really Think They Are So Extraordinary? An Examination of Secular Trends in Narcissism and Self-Enhancement,” Psychological Science (February 2008), 124

You will be responsible for finding the articles listed (or similar ones) to include in your paper. Please select one of the topics from the book.
Include the following in your paper:
• Brief introduction presenting the controversy;
• Summary of both positions;
• Statement of your position on the issue with justification (this means you should build a case and not just state, “This is my position because I think it is best.”) I expect you to put effort into your position;
• Statement of how your controversy may be applied to a multicultural context;
• Statement of how your issue applies to the literacies of: critical, civic, science, and values. Simply include a paragraph heading for each of these four literacies;
• Conclusion statement
Multicultural Application
Increasingly, we have learned that different cultures (within our society and outside of country) may view topics differently than ours. Based upon this, select another culture that may view this controversy from one perspective or another. For example, if you selected the topic, “Is Pornography Harmful”, do Europeans approach the topic the same as Latin Americans, as Asians, as the deaf community? Certain countries may hold values for or against the controversy you have selected. Your statement should demonstrate that you recognize that other cultures may hold specific values that may be different from your culture.
Park University Literacies
To help you understand what these literacies refer to, please read the descriptions below. As you formulate your responses for these, present the implications of your topic within each of these literacies. For example, if you selected the topic, “Is Pornography Harmful”, you should address how a person’s values system influences their position on this issue.
1. For the Critical Literacy – describe and evaluate the reasoning used in the positions to address this issue.
2. For the Civic Literacy – describe how this topic impacts our society, and what citizens can do to resolve it.
3. For the Science Literacy – discuss how science is related to the topic OR how science was used in the Pro or Con arguments. You can also list an area within psychology and the type of psychologist that would study or help to resolve this controversy.
4. For the Values Literacy – describe the values or assumptions that are found in the positions or in the topic in general.
Your grade is partially determined by how you apply your issue to these literacies.
Critical Literacy – Analytical and critical thinking
The student with critical literacy will be able to gather, evaluate, and communicate information effectively; meet the basic computing demands of contemporary life; know standards of excellence; recognize varieties of problem-solving strategies; and be able to contribute to desirable changes or help preserve and transmit fundamental knowledge for the good of society.
Civic Literacy – Community and civic responsibility
The student with civic literacy will be able to see the complexity of social, political, and economic systems and problems on the national and international scene, and then develop ways that would contribute to the solution of such problems through effective citizenship participation.
Science Literacy
The student with science literacy will be able to know the nature of scientific evidence and the scientific method of inquiry, recognize their roles in approaching problems in human society and its physical environment, and use such knowledge in personal scientific pursuits and as a member of the scientific community.
Values Literacy- Personal values and ethics
The student with values literacy is sensitive to value questions, appreciatively and critically aware of differing value systems, in possession of tools for analyzing value questions, and engaged in the process of putting these things together into a constant set of personal values and testing them for life.